Our Hills Are Alive

Written by Anne Cornell on . Posted in Dogwood Festival, Exhibits

Our Hills Are Alive
Opening May 3, 2-5pm

as part of Dogwood Festival 2014 & the 5K Urban Art Walk
runs through June 16, 2014

The theme of this year’s Dogwood Festival, “Our Hills are Alive,” plays off the Triple Locks Theater production of “The Sound of Music” but alludes to Coshocton County’s  lively cultural and artistic life.  The Festival exhibit, opening May 3 at the Pomerene Center for the Arts, celebrates 5 artists: Doug Anderson–glass, Ron Corl–furniture design, Todd Malenke–metal sculpture, Joan Staufer–painting and Erik Neff–woodcuts. With the exception of Erik Neff who grew up in Coshocton and now resides east of Cleveland in Newbery Ohio, the exhibit artists live and work in Coshocton County – more specifically – live and work in somewhat hard to access places on the edges of the county.

There was some joking about using that “edginess” as the uniting theme for the show until insects surfaced as a common interest, imparting a new and slightly humorous connotation to OUR HILLS ARE ALIVE.  In addition to the sensitivity with which these artists respond to their chosen mediums, they are all finely tuned to their rural surroundings.

butterfly figure

Doug Anderson casts detailed molds of real objects one of them being dragonflies (though we’re showing an image of his Butterfly Figure on this page). Doug talks about his work here

insect

Erik Neff was trained as an entomologist.  Though primarily an abstract artist he happily diverged to carve and print meticuoulously detailed woodcuts of microscopic wasps.  Erik talks about his work here

DSC_4401

Todd Malenke who frequently uses botanical forms quickly agreed to playing with bug shapes.  Todd talks about his work here

endtable

Ron Corl builds with ambrosia maple, a wood patterned with fungus stains spread by the tiny ambrosia beetle.  Ron talks about his work here

joan staufer2

Painter Joan Staufer’s use of abstract patterning suggests small boring insect holes and repetative beehive cells.  Joan talks about her work here


"Keeping life interesting in Coshocton County through creativity and arts innovation."